ASU Law Professor to receive Lifetime Achievement Award from Native American Bar

Thursday, September 25, 2014
Robert N. Clinton

Robert N. Clinton, Foundation of Law Professor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native American Bar Association of Arizona (NABA-AZ). The award is given annually to honor an individual for his or her contributions to the field Indian law in Arizona.

Clinton serves as chief justice of the Winnebago Supreme Court and as an associate justice for the Colorado River Indian Tribes Court of Appeals, the Hualapai Tribal Court of Appeals, and the Hopi Court of Appeals. He also serves as a judge pro tem for the San Manuel Band of Serrano Mission Indians.

Clinton has taught Indian Law for more than 40 years, beginning his career in 1973,when he joined the faculty at the University of Iowa College of Law.

“Bob has been an outstanding teacher and scholar of Indian Law,” said former ASU professor and past NABA-AZ lifetime achievement award recipient, William C. Canby. “One of the great victories of the Indian Legal Program at ASU was to entice Bob to join the faculty. He has been thoroughly dedicated to teaching Indian Law, and to working with both students and tribes to advance their understanding of the subject and to make use of that knowledge to their benefit.”

Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee, faculty director of the Indian Legal Program at ASU, agreed that Clinton’s work as a professor has made enormous contributions to the field.

“Bob has been instrumental to the development of Indian law and is the most cited scholar in the field,” Ferguson-Bohnee said. “It is fitting that NABA-AZ recognize Bob for not only his tremendous scholarly contributions but also his dedication to developing and guiding future advocates of tribal law and federal Indian law.”

Colleagues have seen Clinton’s work in the classroom up close.

“I know Bob as a classroom teacher with a reputation for teaching at an exceptionally high level,” said fellow ASU law professor, Charles Calleros.

Two alumni of ASU’s Indian Legal Program also will be honored at the event. The Community Service Award will be presented to Diane Enos (Class of ’92), president of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, and the NABA-AZ Member of the Year Award will be presented to Diandra D. Benally (Class of ’05), assistant general counsel for the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation.

The NABA-AZ Seven Generations Annual Awards Dinner and Silent Auction will be held from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014, at the Radisson Fort McDowell Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Professor Clinton to receive Lifetime Achievement Award from Native American Bar

Thursday, September 25, 2014

 Robert N. Clinton

Robert N. Clinton, Foundation of Law Professor at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native American Bar Association of Arizona (NABA-AZ). The award is given annually to honor an individual for his or her contributions to the field Indian law in Arizona.

Clinton serves as chief justice of the Winnebago Supreme Court and as an associate justice for the Colorado River Indian Tribes Court of Appeals, the Hualapai Tribal Court of Appeals, and the Hopi Court of Appeals. He also serves as a judge pro tem for the San Manuel Band of Serrano Mission Indians.

Clinton has taught Indian Law for more than 40 years, beginning his career in 1973,when he joined the faculty at the University of Iowa College of Law.

“Bob has been an outstanding teacher and scholar of Indian Law,” said former ASU professor and past NABA-AZ lifetime achievement award recipient, William C. Canby. “One of the great victories of the Indian Legal Program at ASU was to entice Bob to join the faculty. He has been thoroughly dedicated to teaching Indian Law, and to working with both students and tribes to advance their understanding of the subject and to make use of that knowledge to their benefit.”

Professor Patty Ferguson-Bohnee, faculty director of the Indian Legal Program at ASU, agreed that Clinton’s work as a professor has made enormous contributions to the field.

“Bob has been instrumental to the development of Indian law and is the most cited scholar in the field,” Ferguson-Bohnee said. “It is fitting that NABA-AZ recognize Bob for not only his tremendous scholarly contributions but also his dedication to developing and guiding future advocates of tribal law and federal Indian law.”

Colleagues have seen Clinton’s work in the classroom up close.

“I know Bob as a classroom teacher with a reputation for teaching at an exceptionally high level,” said fellow ASU law professor, Charles Calleros.

Two alumni of ASU’s Indian Legal Program also will be honored at the event. The Community Service Award will be presented to Diane Enos (Class of ’92), president of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, and the NABA-AZ Member of the Year Award will be presented to Diandra D. Benally (Class of ’05), assistant general counsel for the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation.

The NABA-AZ Seven Generations Annual Awards Dinner and Silent Auction will be held from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014, at the Radisson Fort McDowell Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona.

 

Clinton speaks at NMAI symposium

Monday, September 15, 2014

Foundation Professor of Law Robert N. Clinton will speak at a symposium titled Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations. The event will be held at the National Museum of American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18.

During the event there will be a book releases celebration and the opening of a new museum exhibit, both with the same title as the symposium. Clinton contributed a chapter to the book titled Native Nations: Iconic Historical Relics or Modern Necessity? Guests can enjoy a preview of the exhibit followed by a book signing.

Clinton teaches and writes about federal Indian law, tribal law, Native American history, constitutional law, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyrights, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdicition. He is the co-author of casebooks on Indian law and federal courts, The Handbook of Federal Indian Law (1982 ed.) and multiple editions of American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System, Colonial and American Indian. He also is a Faculty Fellow in the Center of Law, Science & Innovation.

Clinton to speak at upcoming NMAI symposium

Monday, September 15, 2014

 Robert Clinton

Foundation Professor of Law Robert N. Clinton will speak at a symposium titled Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations. The event will be held at the National Museum of American Indian in Washington, D.C. on September 18.

During the event there will be a book releases celebration and the opening of a new museum exhibit, both with the same title as the symposium. Clinton contributed a chapter to the book titled Native Nations: Iconic Historical Relics or Modern Necessity? Guests can enjoy a preview of the exhibit followed by a book signing.

Clinton teaches and writes about federal Indian law, tribal law, Native American history, constitutional law, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyrights, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdicition. He is the co-author of casebooks on Indian law and federal courts, The Handbook of Federal Indian Law (1982 ed.) and multiple editions of American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System, Colonial and American Indian. He also is a Faculty Fellow in the Center of Law, Science & Innovation.

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The symposium proceedings are now posted on YouTube. The URL for the playlist is http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS6nSmuURFJAw1ayMO7MhOJAQYBSH0Zax.

 

Clinton speaks at Federal Bar Association Indian Law Conference

Friday, April 25, 2014

Robert N. Clinton, Foundation Professor of Law, recently presented at the 39th Annual Federal Bar Association’s Indian Law Conference in Santa Fe, N.M.

The conference, “Practicing Indian Law in the Digital Age explored the impact new technology is having on the legal environment of Indian law and policy.

Clinton gave a lunchtime speech at the conference commenting on the final report of the Indian Law and Order Commission entitled “A Roadmap for Making Native America Safer.”

Clinton teaches and writes about federal Indian law, tribal law, Native American history, constitutional law, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyrights, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdiction. He is the co-author of casebooks on Indian law and federal courts, The Handbook of Federal Indian Law (1982 ed.) and multiple editions of American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System, Colonial and American Indian. He also is a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Law, Science & Innovation.

Clinton Quoted in Slate on Effect of Tribal Gay Marriage

10/29/2013
Robert Clinton

Robert Clinton, Foundation Professor of Law, recently was quoted in an article about a Native American gay wedding written by Mark Joseph Stern for Slate magazine.

The article, “How Did a Gay Couple Legally Marry in Oklahoma?” tells the story of two Native American men who were wed under tribal law in a state where same-sex marriage remains formally banned.

Concerning whether the marriage will be recognized by the state of Oklahoma, Clinton said the current patchwork of marriage laws presents an intriguing ambiguity. He said that as a general rule, every state grants respects other states’ laws and rulings, but added that in 1939, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized a state’s right to ignore another state’s law if it seriously contravened its own—the so-called public-policy exception.

“The public-policy exception has never been litigated in application to gay marriage, but it seems possible that tribal gay marriages should be recognized in most states that don’t have strong public policy to the contrary,” Clinton said.

To read the full article, click here.

Clinton teaches and writes about federal Indian law, tribal law, Native American history, constitutional law, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyrights and civil procedure. He is an Affiliated Faculty member of the ASU American Indian Studies Program. He also is a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Law, Science & Innovation.

Clinton Speaks at University of New Mexico Sandoval Conference

10/22/2013
Robert N. Clinton

Robert N. Clinton, Foundation Professor of Law, recently spoke at the University of New Mexico School of Law, for a conference commemorating United States v. Sandoval.

The conference, “One Century Later: Federal Authority in Indian Country, Indian Identity and Status and the Rights of Defendants in Tribal Court,” explored the decision, litigation, aftermath and impact of United States v. Sandoval, which granted federal Indian statutes to the Pueblo people.

Clinton spoke on a panel titled “Sandoval’s Impact on Federal Authority in Indian Country.”

Clinton teaches and writes about federal Indian law, tribal law, Native American history, constitutional law, federal courts, cyberspace law, copyrights, and civil procedure. His publications include numerous articles on federal Indian law and policy, constitutional law, and federal jurisdiction. He is the co-author of casebooks on Indian law and federal courts, The Handbook of Federal Indian Law (1982 ed.) and multiple editions of American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System, Colonial and American Indian. He also is a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Law, Science & Innovation.

Hopi Appellate Court Reaffirms Village Sovereignty

Following up on its earlier Bacavi decision, the Hopi Appellate Court issued a decision on September 10, 2013 interpreting the Hopi Constitution in Duwahoyeoma v. Hopi Tribe, No. 2012-AP-0002. Specifically, the Court reaffirmed the aboriginal sovereignty of the separate Hopi and Tewa villages that formed the basis of its Bacavi decision and held in Duwahoyeoma that Article III, Section 3 of the Hopi Constitution reserved exclusive jurisdiction to the respective Hopi and Tewa Villages to determine how they would be governed and, consequently, that this provision precluded the Hopi Courts from deciding purely internal village disputes as to the form of governance or the legitimacy of Kikmongwi or other traditional religious leaders. The Court did note, however, that the Hopi courts can interpret the Hopi Constitution and otherwise review claims involving the decisions of the Tribal Council or other administrative officers even though such decisions may implicate questions of village governance. Invoking the latter jurisdiction, the Hopi Appellate Court further found that the provision of Article III, Section 3 of the Hopi Constitution that provides that traditional Villages “shall be considered as being under the traditional Hopi organization, and the Kikmongwi of such village shall be recognized as its leader” did not mandate or require the Kikmongwi to serve as the daily governing authority of any Village, but, merely, recognized his traditional role as leader and spokesman for the Village, a role akin to head of state, to communicate village policy or decisions to the Tribal Council, other Villages, or other parties. Finally, the Court interpreted Article III, Section 4 of the Hopi Constitution, which authorizes in certain circumstances the calling of an election run by the United States Department of the Interior Superintendent to change the form of Village government, to not curtail or eliminate preexisting Village sovereignty to change forms of government by other means that do not involve the federal government. Thus, the Court concluded that when Article III, Section 4 stated that Villages “may” use the described federally supervised election procedure, it provided one, but not the only, means of accomplishing Village governmental change but did not indicate that Villages must use that procedure as the exclusive means of making such governance changes. The full opinion is available here.

Professor Clinton Interviewed on Baby Veronica Case

Professor Clinton was interviewed about the Baby Veronica ICWA case that the Supreme Court heard yesterday on Due Diligence.

A copy of the radio interview is located at:

http://voicerussia.com/radio_broadcast/58461461/110989204.html.

Robert Clinton Interviewed on AZ-TV on Tohono O’odham Casino Proposal

AZTV7/Cable 13, Me-TV 7.2, HSN 7.3, Phoenix-Prescott, AZ